Gaylord News is a reporting project of the University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication

Gaylord News

Gaylord News is a reporting project of the University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication

Gaylord News

Gaylord News is a reporting project of the University of Oklahoma Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication

Gaylord News

The CDC vaccine tracker showing Oklahoma’s vaccine distributions as of Feb. 15. Graphic by Jessie Christopher Smith, Gaylord News
Oklahoma vaccinations pushing forward despite record winter storm
Jessie Christopher Smith and Nancy Marie Spears February 21, 2021
Cherokee Tribe details its COVID-19 vaccination plan. Source: Cherokee Tribe
Tribes preparing for vaccine distribution
Nancy Marie Spears, Reporter • December 11, 2020
A model of the novel coronavirus. Stigma associated with COVID-19 infection has affected how people manage their health and communicate with others. (Gaylord News)
Coronavirus stigma affects pandemic response
Bennett Brinkman, Reporter • December 11, 2020
 Medical marijuana is a booming industry in Oklahoma with over 12,000 marijuana business licenses issued.
Marijuana growers struggling to navigate changing legal landscape
Pepper Purpura May 9, 2022

WASHINGTON – Medical marijuana is a booming industry in Oklahoma with over 12,000 marijuana business...

Mining debris is all that remains more than a decade after Picher, Oklahoma, was declared unlivable and evacuated by the U.S. EPA.  (Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality)
Quapaw Tribe awaits action on bill to settle environmental damages
Nancy Marie Spears October 6, 2021

WASHINGTON -- Members of the Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma are awaiting action on legislation that would authorize...

Hern speaks with a reporter in his office the day after the State of the Union, Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2022 (Gaylord News/Mikaela DeLeon)
Oklahoma delegation pans Biden’s State of Union speech
Mikaela DeLeon March 2, 2022

WASHINGTON - President Joe Biden drew mixed reviews from both sides of the aisle to his State of the...

The Kaw Nation’s Sacred Red Rock called “Iⁿ ‘zhúje ‘waxóbe, was a place of cultural ceremony and gathering for the Kaw people prior to removal to Oklahoma in 1872. The stone was moved from the Kaw’s homelands near the Kansas River and Shunganunga Creek, just outside Topeka, to Robinson Park in Lawrence, Kan., as part of Lawrence’s 75th anniversary celebration in 1929, and was fitted with a plaque celebrating the pioneers of Kansas. (Photo provided by James Pepper Henry.)
Oklahoma tribes increasingly reclaim out-of-state ancestral homelands: “We Are Still Here”
Nancy Marie Spears May 2, 2022

Tribes across the nation are increasingly buying back or being gifted back property in their ancestral...